How To Naturally Treat Dog Hyperkeratosis: Why Do Dogs Get Dry, Crusty Noses?

To naturally treat dog hyperkeratosis you need an understanding of your dog’s condition and what’s causing it to occur in the first place! Hyperkeratosis sounds scary but it’s simply a condition that causes your dog’s nose or paws to thicken and become excessively hard.

When your pet produces too much keratin, the fibrous proteins that make up the outer layer of skin, it causes excessive skin growth. As a result, you’ll start seeing a build-up of hard, thick, dry and calloused skin. If left untreated this brittle skin can crack, bleed, and even become infected.

Dog Nasal Hyperkeratosis Vs. Dog Foot Pad Hyperkeratosis

Hyperkeratosis is broken down into it’s two most common types: nasal hyperkeratosis and foot pad hyperkeratosis.

crusty dog nose

Example of Nasal Hyperkeratosis in Dogs

Nasal hyperkeratosis impacts your dog’s nose and muzzle area, while foot pad hyperkeratosis impacts your dog’s feet.

Both types of hyperkeratosis can be incredibly uncomfortable and even painful. Nasal hyperkeratosis prevents your dog from fully using their most valuable sense, their super powered snout. Dogs can smell with far greater capacity than humans, which is why they rely on their sense of smell to investigate the world and stay safe. Yet, in order for the magic to occur their snout must be wet. If your dog’s nose is dry and crusty it no longer functions the same way.

Foot pad hyperkeratosis causes its own sets of issues. Your dog walks around all day on his or her paws, and when paws are tender and sore it makes life more difficult. Dogs often spend a lot of time outdoors in dirt and other unclean surfaces, so dry, cracked paws could easily become infected. Some dogs even develop a limp as a result.

crusty dog paw

An example of foot pad hyperkeratosis

What Causes Dog Hyperkeratosis?

Most dogs could develop hyperkeratosis at any point. Certain dog breeds have a genetic predisposition to developing it more often, including Golden Retrievers, Irish and Bedlington Terriers, Labradors, and Dogues de Bordeaux. In most cases, if your dog’s genes caused the formation of hyperkeratosis it’ll show up within the first year of his or her life.

Idiopathic hyperkeratosis develops for unknown reasons and more commonly affects older dogs.

Dog Hyperkeratosis can also occur as a symptom of one of the following underlying issues:

  • Canine Distemper: A rare virus that can be avoided with proper puppy immunizations. Dogs with distemper develop a variety of symptoms, including nasal hyperkeratosis.
  • Leishmaniasis: A parasite-induced illness often related to sandflies that can cause hyperkeratosis. There are medications available to treat this illness.
  • Pemphigus Foliaceus: This is one of the most common autoimmune skin diseases in both cats and dogs. It causes hyperkeratosis to form on paw pads and is diagnosed with a biopsy.
  • Zinc Responsive Dermatosis: If your dog does not properly absorb Zinc they may develop zinc responsive dermatosis, and as a result hyperkeratosis. Zinc supplements are often prescribed as treatment.

How To Naturally Treat Dog Hyperkeratosis

There is no exact treatment regimen for hyperkeratosis, which leaves many devoted dog owners feeling rather helpless. Before you throw your paws up in defeat, there are 2 breakthrough products proven to soothe, heal and prevent the formation of hyperkeratosis.

How To Naturally Treat Nasal Hyperkeratosis

dog hyperkeratosis spikes

The hyperkeratosis “spikes” fell off to reveal a healthy, moist nose underneath

Snout Soother is specially formulated to effectively treat dog hyperkeratosis of the snout. No matter how dry, cracked, bloody or damaged your dog’s nose may be, Snout Soother is your dog’s superhero.

The moment you apply the dog-approved balm to your pup’s nose, they should feel a sense of relief. Sort of like when you have really dry lips and you apply Chapstick, it just feels so much better.

As your dog experiences relief, Snout Soother goes to work treating and healing the skin. Regular use of Snout Soother can help prevent reformation of nasal hyperkeratosis.

Learn how every last ingredient in Snout Soother works to soothe, treat & prevent a crusty dog nose.

How To Naturally Treat Dog Foot Pad Hyperkeratosis

paw soother treat dog hyperkeratosis

Treat foot pad hyperkeratosis naturally with organic Paw Soother

Paw Soother is specially formulated to effectively treat dog hyperkeratosis of the paw pads. The 100% all-natural balm soothes and heals thanks to a perfect blend of herbal-based plant oils and butters. Every last ingredient plays an important role. For instance, organic coconut oil provides intense moisturizing as well as anti-inflammatory properties, while Vitamin E grants the skin a much-needed boost of collagen production and cell regeneration.

Learn more about Paw Soother’s pawesomely powerful ingredients.

Why Natural Treatments Are So Important For Your Dog

Dogs that develop hyperkeratosis tend to be more sensitive, which is why we are adamant about using the most gentle, all-natural and carefully sourced ingredients. Our products are so safe that even if your dog ingests the entire tube you have nothing to worry about.

healing dog hyperkeratosis

Healing hyperkeratosis results with all-natural Snout Soother

2 responses to “How To Naturally Treat Dog Hyperkeratosis: Why Do Dogs Get Dry, Crusty Noses?”

  1. Matt says:

    Kathy – we’re glad to hear that your pup survived such an attack and the subsequent paralysis. The Paw Soother could actually help a little with giving your pup better traction. A moist, healthy paw is better suited at gripping than a dry, crusty paw. The balm isn’t absorbed immediately, and it’s best if applied when they aren’t quite as active, so you may want to apply it before a nap or bedtime. We hope your sweet boy feels better very soon!

  2. Kathy Johnson says:

    My male greyhound, age 10 1/2 is developing some nasty, hard hyperkeratosis around the edges of several paw pads. He survived a pit bull attack last year that left him paralyzed for 9 days and he’s not too steady on his feet now. I’m interested in trying your product on the hyperkeratosis, but I would like to know if it’s going to leave his feet feeling slippery/greasy, which would affect his mobility. How fast does it soak into the skin?

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